Trump Is Right About ‘Stop and Frisk’

stopandfriskOne of the strategies that helped bring about an 85% reduction in crime in New York City between 1994 and 2013 was the careful and appropriate use of “stop and frisk.” This practice dramatically reduced the number of guns, knives and other dangerous weapons, as well as illicit drugs, in the city. But according to candidate Hillary Clinton and moderator Lester Holt during Monday night’s presidential debate, stop and frisk is “unconstitutional.” They are wrong. In Mrs. Clinton’s case, it’s the usual misrepresenting she does when she does not know what she is talking about. As for Mr. Holt, if a moderator is going to interfere, he should do some homework and not pretend to know the law when he does not. Mr. Holt and NBC cannot overrule the U.S. Supreme Court.  See my previous post on this subject for the citation and an excerpt of the case.

Continue reading “Trump Is Right About ‘Stop and Frisk’”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Captive Lives: The Invisible Lives of Incarceration

tucker-and-dad-1170x658Luna Garcia swipes through the photos on her phone until she finds it — the one of a young man with a slight mustache standing against a wall, his blue shirt neatly pressed, holding a chubby baby girl. It’s the kind of picture someone might snap at a holiday dinner, a grainy image of a girl and her dad. But just out of the frame are armed guards and metal doors. It was visiting day at San Quentin State Prison. It’s a rare photo of Luna with her father. Now 17, she doesn’t have any of him at birthday parties or science fairs. Jose Garcia was serving two years in San Quentin when she was born and has been in and out of incarceration ever since. In the few photos she does have, she can trace the passing years by the colors of his prison jumpsuits.

“He tells me that’s the only thing he knows how to do,” Luna says, her voice flat, resigned. “Prison is all he knows.”

Continue reading “Captive Lives: The Invisible Lives of Incarceration”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Incarceration Nation: How we got there

About the film:
Incarcerating US is a documentary film illustrating how the purpose of prison has changed dramatically in the U.S. With 2.3 million people behind bars, the U.S. has more prisoners than anywhere else in the world. The rate of incarceration in the U.S. has more than quadrupled over the past thirty years. The social and economic costs of the extremely high imprisonment rate demonstrate the need to reassess and make drastic changes to the current system.

The shift towards longer and more rigid sentencing policies in conjunction with the War on Drugs fueled the explosion in the prison population. Political incentives divert scarce resources away from those who are truly a danger to society to those that commit nonviolent drug offenses.

Through the eyes and experiences of people involved with the prison system, this film will show why many agree that the current system is a counterproductive mess. In a penetrating look, it will include interviews with policy experts, attorneys, judges, corrections officials, current and former inmates, former police officers, and reform advocates. It will explore the vested interests that benefit from the current model and reveal how they obstruct reform efforts. With a greater understanding of the history and policies that created the largest prison population in the history of the world, we can foster a more humane criminal justice system and reduce the social and economic costs to the nation.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail